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20120928
20121006
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KRCB (PBS) 16
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Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)
on these changes to the law before they were introduced in state houses across the country. >> the united states of alec. and -- >>> we had a drum roll of media attention that said if you don't stop and watch the debates that night you're really missing out on an important cultural mome. >> announcer, funding is provided by, carnegie corporation of new york, celebrating 100 years of philanthropy and committed to doing real and permanent good in the world. the kohlberg foundation. independent production fund, with support from the partridge foundation, a john and polly guth charitable fund. the clements foundation. park foundation, dedicated to heightening public awareness of critical issues. the herb alpert foundation, supporting organizations whose mission is to promote compassion and creativity in our society. the bernard and audre rapoport foundation. the john d. and catrine. macarthur foundation, committed to building a more just, verdant, and peaceful world. more information at macfound.org." anne gumowitz. the betsy and jesse fink foundation. the hkh foundation. barbara g. fleischman. and
of the "national law journal" walks us through a term that will tackle affirmative action, and may decide disputes over same-sex marriage and civil rights law. >> woodruff: then we turn to the presidential campaign and the analysis of stuart rothenberg and susan page as the candidates fine tune their messages days before the first debate. >> brown: we zero in on one issue confronting the candidates. hari sreenivasan reports on the safety net program known as medicaid. >> anyone of us at an advanced age really is just one fall away from a broken hip that could end you up in a nursing home. >> woodruff: ray suarez talks with author hedrick smith. his new book explores the dismantling of the american dream for the middle class. >> brown: and we look at oppression and empowerment for women around the world, with journalists and filmmakers nicholas kristof and sheryl wudunn. >> once you give a woman education and a chance to work, she can astound you. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the
captioning sponsored by macneil/lehrer productions >> ifill: a pennsylvania judge blocked a new law that would have required voters to show photo i.d. at the polls next month. good evening. i'm gwen ifill. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the newshour tonight, ray suarez examines how the debate over voting rights and election year fraud is playing out around the country. >> ifill: then, we have two takes on the battle for north carolina. jeffrey brown reports on the tightening presidential contest. >> brown: barack obama won this state in 2008 by the slimmest of margins with help from a large african-american turnout. four years later in a down economy it looks like his challenge will be even greater. >> woodruff: and we talk with national public radio's greg allen. he focuses on the outreach to hispanics in the tar heel state. >> ifill: then margaret warner updates the investigation into the assault on the u.s. consulate in libya. >> woodruff: we look at new findings showing australia's great barrier reef has lost half its coral in the last 27 years. >> ifill: and we close wi
it's again the law to deny the holocaust in many european countries. our notion of free speech, especially when it comes to religion, is not shared around the world. >> but is it changing? >> i think it is changing. as the world becomes smaller, we live in a globalized world, and people recognize as president obama said in his speech that someone with a phone camera can cause a stir around the world. we have to be able to adjust. we've got to be able to have a discourse and dialogue when it comes to difficult issues like this rather than take the streets and commit acts of violence. >> i found it interesting american muslims seem to be speaking to two audiences, in fact. on one hand you speak to muslims around the world, and you also speak to american society and trying to say not all muslims are like the people who are in the streets doing violence. has that been a challenge for you all? >> it is a difficult balancing act, but i think people realize that the majority of people o on the streets, they were a very small number. and amongst that small number the ones who committed
responsible foremaning the two vessels has not exercised the care required of them by law to ensure the safety of the vessel that they are navigating as well as the people on board their vessels. >> the hong kong government has set up a special panel to speed up the investigation. >>> the philippines and vietnam have appealed to the international community for a peaceful and legal resolution to the south china sea issue. china wasn't mentioned by name in their speeches to the u.n. general assembly. even so, both countries were clearly calling for support as they resist thepreading influence of asia's rising power. the secretary of foreign affairs rosario urged the countries to quickly agree on a legally binding code of conduct to ease tensions. >> to address this challenge and arrive at a resolution, we must rely on the rule of law and not the force of arms. we must rely on the body of rules that state that disputes must be resolved peacefully. >> vietnam's deputy minister of foreign affairs resisted china's demands that the disputes be resolved through bilateral negotiations and called on the
upon international law. we will strengthen and clarify our position. >> gemba says the measures include running advertisements in overseas newspapers to counter china's claim. the state affiliated china daily faced two-page ads in the "new york times" and "washington post" on september 28th. the ads refer to the islands as the chinese name for the territory. they accused washington and tokyo of crafting backroom deals to give japan administrative control over the islands. it called the deals illegal and invalid. >>> carmakers from around the world are in china this week taking part in an international automobile show. the strained relations over the senkaku islands have put a dent in japan's participation in the event. the international automobile show opened on wednesday with all the flash and glitter usually associated with car shows. on display are the latest models of 65 u.s., european and asian carmakers. japan's toyota and nissan car companies are among those showing off their newest models, but noticeably absent are other well-known japanese brands, honda, mitsubishi and subaru.
is paper because we don't have the laws that require us to check. >> rose: so you have to have paper as a starting point. >> you have to have paper and the right laws you have to do post election ballot audits otherwise you won't know that the results that it is computer reports are actually correct. >> rose: so your commission is to change. >> yes. >> >> rose: and what are the chances you will be able to do this? >> well, one of the reasons -- the main reason we wrote the book is to get the message out, we want people to know and americans to know a great democracy deserves a great voting system and right now, we have a third rate voting system which is just not worthy of our democracy, we are also very concerned thatf there is a very close election or multiple close races in upcoming election and it seems likely will will be that if people don't trust the outcome, that is really bad for our democracy. it is unhealthy and creates. >> rose: it erode trust and confidence. >> it erodes trust it means whoever is the winner or declared winner will not have the support of a large pearjt o
to get the same amount of pay. i mean, president obama did sign the lily led better act into law but even the president pays women less than men. even the senate pays women less than it does men. so practice what you preach. this say problem we have to get over. >> but that's men doing it. and the problem with this study is -- >> so you think it's okay because approximate the obama does it? >> wait a minute. what are you talking about? i'm talking about men versus women. and we had assumed that if women were in charge that that would effect other women and to find that at least in this aspect it does not, ought to call for some soul-searching on the part of women. i'm not going to excuse it fo a moment. if it were a man, i'll tell you, we have seen that they reach out and mentor young men more easily than young women and we have been critical of that. >> go and look at the senate payroll. all the women senators, they have the same problem. it's a problem. >> and unfair. >> unfair. >> it definitely goes back to character. i totally support -- we need to reach inside ourselves as a former l
spending, the country ached when they also announced 43 new laws they say will fix the economy, the people shrugged. no one really believes that will work, because spaniards aren't working-- that's the problem-- unemployment is rampant now over 25%. whilst the property crash that started the crisis is still festering. further austerity measures will simply suck more money out of the economy and threaten an even deeper recession. spain is trying to save a total of 40 billion from its budget which will hurt. it won't be as excruciately painful as a new round of cuts in greece. they are trying to save an extra 12 billion from a budget that has already been pared to the bone. no one is spared the pain greece not even the most vulnerable. disabled protestors took to the streets today pleading for their benefits not to be cut further. they can no longer even afford the medicine they need they say. >> sreenivasan: the greek government today came to basic agreement on $15 billion worth of cuts in spending over the next two years. the country needs to make the cuts if it wants to keep receiving bai
decisions about what treatments they're given. that's explicitly prohibited in the law. but let's go back to what governor romney indicated that, under his plan, he would be able to cover people with preexisting conditions. well, actually, governor, that isn't what your plan does. what your plan does is to duplicate what's already the law, which says if you are out of health insurance for three months, then you can end up getting continuous coverage, and an insurance company can't deny you if it's been under 90 days. but that's already the law. and that doesn't help the millions of people out there with preexisting conditions. there's a reason why governor romney set up the plan that he did in massachusetts. it wasn't a government takeover of health care. it was the largest expansion of private insurance. but what it does say is that insurers, you've got to take everybody. now, that also means you've got more customers. but when governor romney says that he'll replace it with something, but can't detail how it will be in fact replaced, and the reason he set up the system he did in massach
. >> obviously there are serious criminal charges being pressed and the full force of the law obviously needs to play on that. the bigger issue about how a democcy fashion as proper conversation in fragmented societies is something that i think is very, very profound. but if you think about it, the gridlock you complain about, we can't get agreement in our country about building a third runway in heathrow airport, much less care about the elderly swrenchts the same problem. >> there is gridlock on syria, there is grid lock on the saving of the eu, there is gridlock at the national politics, and representative politics is facing a very, very buying set of charges, people feel they are t getting a proper say. now, there are rorms in every country that are going to have to be particular to that country, but there is a more generic issue about how in a world of multiaccess to information we have a proper conversation about how to take our countries forward. >> it is good to see you. >> very nice to see you. >> david miliband, former foreign minister and now a member of parliament in great britain
the first thing you have to do is let all of the 2001-2003 tax laws sunset. go away. that's a tax increase, most of which the president wouldn't support. then you have to cut by $5 trillion. so compared to where we are now it's a much smaller reduction in tax revenue which makes it easier to fill the revenue hole and we have five studies, one from martin feldstein, one from the tax foundation, one from the american enterprise institute, we have studies that show there are plans that meet the governor's goal, cut rates 20% across the board, don't lose revenue and make sure the rich pay their fair share of taxes so it can be done. >> brown: but as to filling the le that we're talking about" those studies -- >> they fill the hole. >> brown: but it depends on where you're at in terms of your income. >> so i think the key is there are tax plans that can fill that hole. jared can write a tax plan that fills that hole and raises taxes and those are the one it is democrats are referring to. >> brown: go ahead. >> first of all, some of what doug just said confused me even more about this because go
as a humanitarian disaster in syria. and it is clearly a violation of international law. but i think seen from a strategic point of view both russia and china should have a self-interest in being so to speak on the right side of history. and i think that could be an argument for them in favor of delivering a clear and unified and strong message from t internaonal community. >> rose: do you think it's a stalemate today? >> more or less it is a stalemate. with severe consequences for the people of syria. and i think the international community has a responsibility to deliver a very clear message to the assad regime that they must stop violence and initiate a process towards democracy in syria. no regime can in the long-term neglect the will of the people. >> rose: when you look at the balkans, we had an intervention without a u.n. resolution. nato acted without a u.n. resolution. can you imagine that happening in syria? >> testimony brief answer is no, but let me stress that nato acted on the basic of the principles of the u.n. charter when we took responsibility for the operation in kosovo. the
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16 (some duplicates have been removed)

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